Vote on Election Day

Polls are open on November 3, 2020 from 7 am to 8 pm. Find your polling place at michigandems.com/pollingplace.

Please wear a mask and observe social distancing at your polling place.

Yes! Your right to vote for all of the candidates of one party by filling in a single oval or box on the ballot was restored by the passage of Proposal 3 in 2018. In the partisan section of the ballot, look for “Straight Party Ticket” and fill in the oval or box for “Democratic Party.” Don’t forget to also vote for individual choices in the non-partisan section (judges and proposals), which is not covered by your straight-party vote. 

If you have the receipt you received when you registered to vote, show it to the poll worker and then vote.

If you don’t have your receipt, give the poll worker your address and ask if you’re at the correct polling place. If you are not at the right polling place for your address, go to the correct polling place.

If you are at the correct polling place but are not on the voter list, you can go to your city/ township clerk’s office with proof of residency and register to vote before 8 pm. While at the clerk’s office, you can vote by absentee ballot.

If you cannot go to the clerk’s office with proof of residency, you may be able to cast a “provisional ballot.” To do this, you’ll have to swear you believe you previously registered to vote. If you can provide a photo ID that shows your current address in that precinct, your provisional ballot will go into the machine and be counted on Election Day. If not, it will go into an envelope, and the clerk will review it after Election Day. If your ballot goes into the envelope, you have six days after Election Day to go to the clerk’s office with any documentation to show that you are registered to vote.

No. But if you have it, bring it with you. You will be asked for a photo ID. If you do not have a photo ID or do not have it with you, you can sign a simple form and vote.

If this is your first time voting in Michigan, you still don’t need a photo ID. However, a small number of first-time voters who registered through the mail or a voter registration drive may need to provide some documentation to vote. Electronic or paper copies of any of the following will work:

A photo ID with your name and picture (regardless of the address or if it has an address):

  • Driver’s license or personal ID card from any state
  • High school or college ID
  • Passport
  • Military or government-issued photo ID; or
  • Tribal ID card

A non-photo ID with your name and address on it:

  • Current utility bill
  • Bank statement
  • Paycheck stub
  • Government check; or
  • Any other government document

Maybe. You need the receipt if you registered to vote on or after October 20, 2020. If you have it, bring it with you.

If you go to your polling place on Election Day and you have any problem getting a ballot, call the Voter Assistance Hotline at 1-833-MI-VOTES (1-833-648-6837). 

If you are not listed in the poll book for any reason, you can go to your city/township clerk’s office until 8 pm, re-register and vote right there. 

Tell a poll worker immediately if you feel someone is trying to intimidate you or harass you. If the poll worker is the problem, or they don’t address the problem, call your local city/township clerk or the Voter Assistance Hotline, 1-833-MI-VOTES (1-833-648-6837).

If someone is challenging your right to vote, take the following steps:

  • Step 1: Ask to be sworn in by the poll worker
  • Step 2: Answer whatever questions are necessary to establish your eligibility to vote
  • Step 3: Vote.

If you make a mistake, ask for a new ballot right away. You have the right to a new ballot if you catch the mistake before your ballot is inserted into the tabulator machine and counted.

If the tabulator machine rejects your ballot, ask for a new one. You have the right to start over.

If the tabulator machine isn’t working, you can place your completed ballot into a bin in the tabulator machine. The poll workers will insert your ballot into the tabulator once the machine is working again.

You have the right to an accessible polling place and an accessible voting machine. If it is before Election Day, call your city/ township clerk right away and ask for an assignment to an alternate site that is accessible. You can also call the Voter Assistance Hotline by dialing 1-833-MI-VOTES (1-833-648-6837). 

If it is Election Day, send someone into the polling place to request curbside voting on your behalf. The poll workers at your polling place will bring a ballot outside so you can vote.

If you vote in Colfax Township or the City of Fennville, you have the right to a ballot and election materials in Spanish.

If you vote in the City of Hamtramck, you have the right to a ballot and election materials in Bengali.

If you do not read or write English, and a ballot is not available in your language, you have the right to assistance from anyone you choose. However, the person cannot be your employer, an agent of your employer or an officer or agent of your labor union.

You have the right to vote independently using an accessible voting machine. If you would like to use an accessible voting machine, tell an election official when you arrive to vote.

You have the right to assistance from the election officials. You can ask the election officials for instructions on how to use the voting equipment or assistance at any time, even after you’ve entered the voting booth.

If you are blind, disabled, or unable to read or write, you have the right to assistance from anyone you choose. However, the person cannot be your employer, an agent of your employer or an officer or agent of your labor union.

RETURN TO THE

Voting Center